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Conditional IF Clause - Part 2

Unlike 1st conditional where conditional proposition is a possibility, in case of 2nd, 3rd and mixed conditional, the conditional preposition is unreal or hypothetical. Since condition and outcome can belong to same or different time tense, accordingly type of conditionals too can be different. Conditions being unrealistic/ hypothetical, such conditions along with outcome are always negation of what is real and true, as summarised below. True proposition: p, hence q; Imaginary/Wistful/ Desirable proposition: If not p, then not q True proposition: p, hence not q; Imaginary/Wistful/ Desirable proposition: if not p, then q True proposition: not p, hence q; Imaginary/Wistful/ Desirable proposition: if p, then not q True proposition: not p, hence not q; Imaginary/Wistful/ Desirable proposition: if p, then q p is cause in true proposition and unreal/imaginary cause in IF condition clause. q is outcome in true preposition and outcome of unreal cause in conditional proposition. This rule of negation doesn’t apply when zero or 1st conditional is converted to 2nd and 3rd or mixed conditional. True proposition: If p, then q; If imaginary/wistful/unreal/hypothetical p, then imaginary q Before proceeding with other conditionals of type 2,3, and Mixed, it is necessary to know what are simple, perfect, continuous, and perfect continuous aspects of conditional which are different from aspects with tenses. These are used for the main clause. Simple Conditional aspect: WOULD; Perfect Conditional aspect: WOULD HAVE; Continuous Conditional aspect: WOULD BE; Perfect Continuous Conditional: WOULD HAVE BEEN The table below illustrates all the possible cases.

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